Breaking Conventions: Interdisciplinary Methodologies & Art History

Saturday, May 20, 2017

6th Annual Graduate Student Conference

Culver Center for The Arts in Downtown Riverside, CA

UC Riverside – Department of The History of The Art

Keynote Address: Dr. Carolyn Dean, University of California, Santa Cruz

 View the 2017 conference schedule

Special Thanks to our Sponsors:

The Department of History of Art, Center of Ideas and Society, CHASS Dean’s Office, UCR Graduate Student Association

For more information visit artsblock.ucr.edu or email ahgsu.ucr@gmail.com

Gluck Fellowships for Graduate Art History Students

We are pleased to announce that the UCR Department of the History of Art will once again participate in the Gluck Fellowship Program in 2017-18. The Gluck Fellows Program of the Arts is an arts outreach program here at UCR.

The Gluck Fellows Program of the Arts provides fellowships to UC Riverside undergraduate and graduate students to conduct arts-related presentations, performances, and workshops in Riverside County schools, residential facilities for elderly care and community centers. Participating departments include Art, Creative Writing, Dance, History of Art, Music, and Theatre, as well as the UCR/ARTSblock. Graduate students in the History of Art have participated by making presentations to a variety of community groups in Riverside.

For more background, go to http://gluckprogram.ucr.edu/.

Next year, we anticipate we will have six Gluck Classroom Fellows and one GluckGlobal Fellow working with the Visual Resources Collection (VRC), contingent on continued funding from the Gluck Foundation. 

The Gluck Classroom Fellowships are an excellent opportunity to develop your teaching skills while earning financial aid. The VRC GluckGlobal Fellow will work exclusively on a collaboration between UC Riverside and the Society of Architectural Historians (SAH) through the Color Film Emergency Project (CFEP) and may be of particular value to those students interested in the history of photography, history of architecture, collection management, registrarial experience, and/or visual resource management.

Application deadline is Monday, May 15, 2017. 

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FACES: Faces, Art, and Computerized Evaluation Systems

This event is sponsored by the College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences

Conrad Rudolph

Thursday, May 18, 2017

5:10 p.m.

ARTS 333

In the application of face recognition technology to photographed human faces, a number of difficulties are inherent in a real or perceived alteration of appearance of the face through variations in facial expression, age, angle of pose, and so on. With works of portrait art, not only do all these problems pertain, but these works also have their own additional challenges. Most notably, portrait art does not provide what might be called a photographic likeness but rather one that goes through a process of visual interpretation on the part of the artist. In this lecture, Professor Rudolph will discuss how, after two years of NEH funded research, FACES has demonstrated proof of concept, begun work on the style of the individual artist, and tested the FACES algorithm with a few “identifications,” in the process establishing the initial parameters of the application of face recognition technology to works of portrait art while at the same time retaining the human eye as the final arbiter.

CHASS Distinguished Research Lecturer

Event is free and open to the public.

Light refreshments will be served

in ARTS 333

Conrad Rudolph, Distinguished Professor of Medieval Art History

Department of the History of Art

University of California, Riverside

Download the flyer

The University of California, Riverside Department of the History of Art, in conjunction with the UCR Center for Ideas and Society Powerful Migrations conference, present:

Migrating the Museum Part 1

FRIDAY, APRIL 28, 12:00 PM

Public unveiling of four stereograph viewers constructed by artist Arnold Martin, installed on the Main Street Pedestrian Mall in Riverside, CA. Each is loaded with five 3-dimensional images drawn from the California Museum of Photography’s archive of more than 300,000 stereographs. Co-curated by Rachel Browning, Reana Carr, Angelica De Jesus, Ena Hillery, Jenny Le, Kalene Paquia and Amy Vasquez, seven undergraduates in the History of Art, advised by Susan Laxton, Assistant Professor of the History of Photography at UCR.

Pedestrian Mall, Culver Arts Center, 3834 Main Street, Riverside

Support for this project has been provided by the UCR Office of Undergraduate Education, The Center for Ideas and Society, UCR International Affairs, The California Museum of Photography, and the City of Riverside Arts and Cultural Affairs Division.

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Brink Carrot Lecture Series presents:

Karlyn Olvido
2016 Richard G. Carrott Travel Award
“The History of American Surgery as Told through 19th-century Photographs”
and
Carlotta Falzone Robinson
2016 Barbara B. Brink Travel Award
“Archibald Knox: British Modernity and Celtic Identity”
 
Each year, the UCR Art History department calls for applications for two graduate student awards. Students with plans to conduct archival research, museum visits, or other research related travels are strongly encouraged to apply: www.arthistory.ucr.edu/graduate/brink-carrott-graduate-awards/

Rebecca Peabody Lecture flyerOn Building a Career in Expanded Academia

Rebecca Peabody is Head of Research Projects & Programs at the Getty Research Institute. She earned a joint PhD from Yale University in the History of Art and African American Studies, and focuses her research on representations of race, gender, and nationality in twentieth-century American art and culture. Her scholarly publications include Consuming Stories: Kara Walker and the Imagining of American Race (2016), a literary and art historical analysis of Walker’s artwork that focuses on the role of the entertainment industry, and its consumers, in processes of racialization; and three edited volumes on American art in a global context. Her trade book The Unruly PhD: Doubts, Detours, Departures and Other Success Stories (2014) is a collection of first-person stories recounted by former graduate students who have successfully reached the other side of a PhD – and are willing to speak frankly about the challenges and decisions they faced along the way. She has taught at Yale University and the University of Southern California. Her two most recent books – one a scholarly monograph, and the other a trade book – provide a point of departure for a larger conversation about the adventure of building a career in expanded academia.