hybridHybrid Modernities: Architecture and Representation at the 1931 Colonial Exposition, Paris
2003, The MIT Press
Patricia Morton, author

The 1931 International Colonial Exposition in Paris was a demonstration of French colonial policy, colonial architecture and urban planning, and the scientific and philosophical theories that justified colonialism. The Exposition displayed the people, material culture, raw materials, manufactured goods, and arts of the global colonial empires. Yet the event gave a contradictory message of the colonies as the “Orient” — the site of rampant sensuality, decadence, and irrationality — and as the laboratory of Western rationality. In Hybrid Modernities, Patricia Morton shows how the Exposition failed to keep colonialism’s two spheres separate, instead creating hybrids of French and native culture. Read More →

Paris-as-GameboardParis As Gameboard: Man Ray’s Atgets
2002, Ex. cat. New York: The Wallach Gallery
Susan Laxton, author

Soon after moving to France, Man Ray began collecting the works of his forebear Eugene Atget, whose pictures surveyed Paris in the late 19th and early 20th century. Here, for the first time, these images of the urban landscape are considered through a Surrealist frame collectively, as a peripatetic surrealist text comparable to André Breton’s Nadja and Louis Aragon’s Paris Peasant.

 

Book cover, Re-Visionen. Zur Aktualität von Kunstgeschichte

Re-Visionen: Zur Aktualität von Kunstgeschichte
2002, Akademie-Verlag
Jeanette Kohl, author

This book is an homage to Swiss art historian Alexander Perrig, whose incorruptible eye and unconventional thinking inspired 15 case studies, written for this book. They all revise established interpretations, with Perrig’s work in mind, from the façade of the Trier Cathedral to scientific illustrations of the 17th century to the Latin Lover in the era of silent films. With essays by Wolfgang Kemp, Hans Joachim Kunst, Norberto Gramaccini, Jeanette Kohl, Roberto Zapperi, Jochen Staebel, Christina Riebesell, Horst Bredekamp, Barbara und Richard Huettel, Ursula Harter, Monika Wagner, Peter Rautmann, Renate Berger, Joerg Jochen Berns, Werner Hofmann, and an introduction by Leo Steinberg.

Review by Michael Thimann, Sueddeutsche Zeitung

SpiritofanAge

Spirit of an Age: Nineteenth-Century Paintings From the National Galerie, Berlin
2001, National Gallery Company
Françoise Forster-Hahn, et al

Exhibition catalog. Contributions by Françoise Froster-Hahn, Claude Keisch, Peter-Klaus Schuster, Angelika Wesenberg, Christopher Riopelle and Birgit Verwiebe. Examined artists incllude Caspar David Friedrich, Carl Blechen, Adolph Menzel, Wilhelm Beibi, Anselm Feuerbach, Carl Schuch Max Liebermann, etc. Comparisions to 19th century french paintings too. Bibliography. Index. 192pp.

FiguredinMarbleFigured in Marble: the Making and Viewing of Eighteenth-Century Sculpture
2001, London and Los Angeles: V&A Publications and J.Paul Getty Museum (shortlisted for Apollo Book of the Year 2001)
Malcolm Baker, author

This work is a study of 18th-century British sculpture, illustrated with sculptures from both the V&A and the J. Paul Getty Museum and also many impressive pieces from private collections and churches. The book starts suggesting new ways of looking at 18th-century sculpture and exploring its relationship to themes that have figured prominently in recent discussions on British painting. The relationship between painting and sculpture, and the links between making and viewing, are themes that are explored throughout the book. The chapters are arranged in five sections, each prefaced by a brief introduction, forming groups of case studies which illustrate approaches to: writing sculptural histories; design, making and materials; categories and genres; and finally, settings, collecting and display.

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